Order, Pay, They’re Done.

Modern restaurant interior with tables and sofas

Do you teach your employees to look around?

Last weekend, my family went to a cafeteria-style bar-b-que restaurant that we visit regularly.  Most of the employees behind the line are gentlemen in their twenties.  Most of the counter workers are high school or college ladies.

Unfortunately, I had three encounters with staff that left me wondering why I was there.  Once I had to wait as the cashier walked to the counter directly in front of me, accomplished her task and walked away without ever looking up at me.  At the same time six workers were about 20 feet down the line seemingly having a good time unaware of anyone outside their group.  Two other ladies were filling to go bags without acknowledging patrons standing before them.


people, friendship, cloud computing and technology concept - close up of teenage friends with smartphone outdoors

The best response to a limited cell phone policy I’ve heard came from a high school principal in Texas.  His school allows cellphone use when directed by a teacher but not in the hallways or at lunch.  Other schools in the area are more lenient so one of his students asked why they couldn’t use their phones during lunch.

He said he feels that students have more opportunity to engage in social media that face-to-face conversation.

“A conversation around a table that is engaging and causes people to communicate with each other is going to be very beneficial when you get older or when you apply for that job.”

This may be a good policy to instill the next time your family goes out to dinner.

The Truth or Something Close

When in doubt, tell the truth

Does anyone really care if you tell them the truth or do they simply expect it to have elements of the truth. As I’m writing this Hillary Clinton has been all over television for the past several days explaining her email server.  Some, it seems, don’t believe her version of the story. Many contend it’s nothing.

So the question is, do we really care if we suspect someone is not telling us the truth?

Communications professionals must walk a fine line since they always want to present their district/client is the best possible light, but how far is too far?